92 results for author: NatureKidsBC


BIG NEWS FOR CANADA’S NATURAL SPACES!

The government just announced projects that will help Canada meet its international commitment to protect 17% of our land and freshwater by 2020. There’s more to do, but this is great news for nature — and for all of us. This announcement allocates $175 million from its Nature Challenge Fund for 67 conservation projects over four years. This is a major milestone on the path to protecting Canada’s threatened natural areas.  Hundreds of species that call Canada’s natural areas home lack the protections necessary for them to thrive, and this is only getting worse with the effects of climate change and increasing development.&nb...

BOOK LAUNCH: GONE IS GONE

When it comes to extinction, size doesn't matter. When something disappears from the ecosystem, everything is affected. When it comes to taking action and sparking change, size also doesn't matter. Little ones have the capacity to make a tangible difference in protecting wildlife, and Isabelle Groc's newest children's book speaks to exactly that. NatureKids BC is proud to announce the launch of Gone is Gone: Wildlife Under Threat, in partnership with the Museum of Vancouver. Gone is Gone, published by Orca Books, covers important topics regarding endangered wildlife. In this book, kids can learn about endangered species, why they become endang...

VOLUNTEER POSTING: Directors (Board of Directors)

NatureKids BC is currently recruiting for Directors to join our Board! This is a great opportunity to gain valuable/rewarding experience working with a non-profit organization. Note that these positions can be conducted remotely from anywhere in BC. The Directors set the strategic direction for the organization and are collectively accountable to the NatureKids community, funders and other stakeholders. Directors are accountable for NatureKids BC’s performance in relation to its mission and strategic objectives and for the effective stewardship of financial and human resources. Time Commitment: 5 to 10 hours monthly on average (prepara...

VOLUNTEER POSTING: TREASURER (BOARD OF DIRECTORS)

NatureKids BC is currently recruiting for a Treasurer to join our Board! This is a great opportunity to gain valuable/rewarding experience working with a non-profit organization. Note that this position can be conducted remotely from anywhere in BC. Time Commitment: Approximately 10 to 15 hours monthly on average (preparation and review of financial records, attendance at meetings and consultation), including time as the Treasurer and a Board member generally. Board meetings are held every other month, except during the summer (with the occasional addition of a "special meeting”). Directors may attend in person (meetings are typically held ...

First Annual Summer Nature Photo Competition

All NatureKids BC members - children and adults - can capture the beauty of BC's nature in the summertime by taking part in our first annual summer nature photo competition. Participants can submit up to 5 photos for a chance to: Have your photo published in the December issue of NatureWILD Win a complimentary framing of your nature photo, and Win some fabulous prizes! There will be one winner from each of these three categories: Kids 5-8, Kids 9-12, and Adults. HOW TO ENTER: Send up to 5 nature photos to photocontest2019@naturekidsbc.ca, along with your name, age, and the NatureKids BC club you belong to. We ask members with Instagram ...

NatureKids BC online silent auction is back!

Fancy going to see a spectacular musical performance of Roald Dahl’s Matilda? Or how about a spot in a Fresh Air Learning summer camp or a membership to the Victoria Bug Zoo? All these and much more could be yours as the second annual NatureKids BC online silent auction opens for bids on May 4. This is your chance to support a wonderful charity that helps children in British Columbia get outdoors to explore, play, learn about and take action for nature. The money we raise from the auction will be allocated entirely to our new Nature Club Fund. This fund will be accessible only to our volunteer nature club leaders around the province. It will help ...

Job posting: Executive Director

NatureKids BC Job Alert! Our Executive Director, Louise Pedersen, is moving on to a new position with the Outdoor Recreation Council of BC, and we're now searching for the right person to pick up the daily strategic and operational leadership and continue to move the organization forward. The successful candidate will join a team of competent and passionate staff, an inspired and engaged board of directors, an incredible group of volunteers who lead our community-based family clubs, and with a strategic planning process underway this really is an exciting time to get involved with one of BC's most awesome organizations (at least in our humble ...

Nature Q&A with Al: Squirrels

Q: What is the difference between a red squirrel and a Douglas squirrel?   A: I love squirrels, they are so much fun to watch - always busy, going about their business of gathering food, or chattering loudly to warn of predators such as large owls, hawks, long-tailed weasels and American marten. In BC we have two related squirrel species –American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) and Douglas Squirrel (Tamiasciurus douglasii). How to tell the difference? The red squirrel’s eye rings and tummy are white; the Douglas squirrel has orangey eye rings and tummy. Both feed on a variety of foods such as conifer seeds, berries, bird’s ...

Why Are Fish Shaped The Way They Are?

What is a fish? A fish is a vertebrate (an animal with a backbone) that lives in water. There are more fish than any other kind of vertebrate - not surprising since our planet is mostly water. Now to our question – why ARE fish shaped the way they are? To answer that, it is important to understand the environment in which fish live. This affects their shape and how they survive. First of all, fish are cold-blooded animals. Mammals, including humans, are ‘warm-blooded’- their bodies can control their own temperature. Mammals can grow a layer of fat or fur to protect them from the cold, or they can take shelter in a cave. If they get hot, ...

Hunters in the sky

Because many different species of birds hunt by day, they use different ways of catching prey so they do not compete with each other - here are just a few of the ways. #1 - Pounce from high up: Red-tail Hawk While the Red-tail is almost the largest bird you’ll see, even the biggest one weighs only a little over one kilogram - yet it can catch rabbits of double that weight! The Red-tail Hawk has very sharp eye-sight and can see long distances. It can spot prey from 30 metres away. Sitting, very still, high up on trees and telephone poles, the hawk moves its eyes all the time – left, right, down below, behind, then forward. When the hawk ...